Woman Started Experiencing A Fishy Smell Coming From Her Vagina And You Won’t Believe Why!!! [DETAILS]

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A 22-year-old woman developed a foul-smelling discharge as a result of not washing her vagina after having unprotected sex.

The woman – known only as Nu Nu – admitted to regularly ‘forgetting’ to wash her intimate area.

Nu Nu visited nurse Sarah – of E4’s hit show The Sex Clinic – worried she may have bacterial vaginosis (BV) or an STI due to a ‘fishy smell’ down below.

The patient, who lives in Surrey, planned to be celibate for a year after deciding ‘men are trash’ and her vagina is ‘precious’ – but lasted just six months before having sex with two men in just 48-hours.

Determined to make sure she was ‘clean’, Nu Nu went to Sarah for an STI test, but then told the nurse she has had BV before.

Sarah told Nu Nu bacterial vaginosis is not an STI but can be triggered by having sex without a condom, adding a fishy odour is a common symptom.

Nu Nu – whose STI test came back clear – admitted poor genital hygiene has triggered her BV before.

Nu Nu (pictured) developed a foul-smelling discharge as a result of not washing her vagina. After initially thinking it was an STI, a test came back clear, with nurse Sarah – of E4’s The Sex Clinic – suggesting it may be bacterial vaginosis, which can be triggered by condom-less sex

Nu Nu – who sells hair extensions online – visited the clinic worried she may have an STI after having unprotected sex twice about a month ago.

She hoped to go a year without intercourse after being left heartbroken by someone who she thought was her ‘soulmate’.

Despite her best efforts, her ‘vagina couldn’t take it anymore’.

Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common cause of unusual vaginal discharge.

It affects around one in three women at some point in their lives.

Although it is not an STI, it does increase a woman’s risk of catching a sexually-transmitted infection.

BV is caused by a change to the delicate bacterial balance in a woman’s vagina.

The most common symptom is a fishy-smelling discharge, particularly after sex.

There may also be a change to the discharge’s colour or texture, such as it becoming grey or watery.

But half of women with BV experience no symptoms.

If a woman suspects she has BV, she should go to her GP or sexual-health clinic to confirm it is not an STI.

Once diagnosed – via a cotton bud ‘smear’ – BV is usually treated via prescribed antibiotic tablets, or gels or creams.

BV often returns within three months.

Those who get it more than twice in six months will need treatment for up to half-a-year.

BV can be prevented by using just water to wash the genital area and opting for showers over baths.

Perfumed soaps, vaginal deodorants, douches, strong detergents and even smoking raise a woman’s risk of the condition.

BV is more common in those who are sexually active, have recently changed their partner or have ‘the coil’.

If ‘caught’ during pregnancy, BV can lead to a premature birth or miscarriage.

Worried pregnant women should speak to their GP or midwife.

Nu Nu, who was born in Nigeria, claims one of the men she had sex with was a ‘stranger’ who sneakily removed the condom midway through intercourse.

She also thought her fishy-smelling discharge could be BV, after experiencing similar symptoms in the past.

Sarah explained BV’s symptoms, starting with a fishy odour.

‘That’s how I know I [have] it because of the fishy smell,’ Nu Nu said.

‘And also [I get it] when I forget to wash my vagina.’

A clearly baffled Sarah asked: ‘How can you forget to wash your vagina?’

To which Nu Nu had no response other than ‘yeah I know, it’s terrible’.

But she added she now rarely forgets to wash since learning it triggers her BV.

She also claims she has to ‘pee’ after sex in order to avoid the condition.

Sarah agreed urinating after intercourse helps prevent BV.

And she also encouraged Nu Nu to wash her vagina morning and night.

The nurse stressed, however, the vagina is ‘self cleansing’.

She therefore urged Nu Nu not to use any soap or shower gel on the delicate area.

Perfumed soaps can affect the delicate bacteria levels and pH of the vagina, which may lead to thrush or irritation.

Summing up all she learned at the clinic, Nu Nu said: ‘I have to see the text saying you’re safe.

‘If I ain’t seen that text, we not ‘f****** mate.’

Twitter users were horrified with some being disgusted and others simply amazed that a woman could forget to wash her vagina.

One Tweeter found the whole thing funny, and seemed amazed that anyone would go on national television and admit to not washing down below.